Here is an interesting story from central CT and the practice of sustainable forestry on private lands (link to story).  It is nice to see some stories from the eastern US where private owners are unabashedly deciding to manage their forest in a fashion that is productive, aesthetic, conservation-minded, and sustainable.  But, I would argue, all the forestry we practice on private (or public) lands should meet such criteria.  The owner found a competent forester and worked through the details.  Each parcel would of course have different details.

 

There is another and interesting spin on the story, and perhaps why it made the news.  The owner is participating in a regional/local effort called Walktober Fest.  In this community, a series of 100 walks, hikes, paddles, and other events will allow local and not-so-local folks to enjoy and learn about the natural world around them.  The woodlot owner has agreed to lead a walk in his woods to talk about the value and virtue of practicing sustainable forestry.

 

Below are some recent photos, courtesy of Rebecca Hargrave, of some landowners on their own version of a Walktober Fest focused on small woodlot management and ATV logging.  See more about ATV logging here.  See the calendar on this site for future similar events.

Views: 829

Comment by Rich Taber on October 26, 2011 at 5:13pm

A slight correction to this post: the property is in Griswold Ct. which is in the northern part of New London County, which is in Eastern Ct; I know this because this is where I grew up and first became enamored of the natural world. The Walktoberfest mentioned is sponsored by The Last Green Valley, an organization dedicated to the preservation of the natural heritage of Eastern Ct. and a small part of adjacent Massachusetts.  The Last Green Valley, if viewed from a nightime satellite photo, is the only area in the northeastern seaboard between Washington D.C. and Boston that is not drowned out by lights.  This organization is an excellent example of the "think globally, act locally" concept. It is a beautiful area and this organization and people are doing a great job of trying to preserve this part of New England.  Info can be found at http://www.tlgv.org.

  

Comment

You need to be a member of CornellForestConnect to add comments!

Join CornellForestConnect

Forum

Urban Forestry Presentation Link

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Forest Health on Thursday. 0 Replies

Urban Forestry Presentation Link ---- …Continue

Stone Walls

Started by Brett Chedzoy in Woodlot Management May 14. 0 Replies

One of my first "real" jobs in forestry in the mid-1990's was in southern New England.  Although I had seen some stone walls here and there growing up in NY, I had never seen stone walls like those of coastal New England.  I remember one property on…Continue

Do Trees Talk to each other? See Video

Started by Alicia Rose in Forest Health Apr 24. 0 Replies

Suzanne Simard: How trees talk to each other | TED TalkVideo for How trees communicate with each other▶ 18:19https://www.ted.com/.../suzanne_simard_how_trees_talk_to_each_…Continue

Forest Health

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Forest Health Mar 8. 0 Replies

Why Logs Are Important ---…Continue

Forest Adaptation Resources Climate Change Tools and Approaches for Land Managers

Started by Alicia Rose in Forest Health. Last reply by Carl DuPoldt Mar 1. 1 Reply

Forest Adaptation Resources: Climate Change Tools and Approaches for Land Managers, 2nd edition link -- https://www.fs.fed.us/nrs/pubs/gtr/gtr_nrs87-2.pdf---------------------Adaptive…Continue

New Forest Farm

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Agroforestry Feb 15. 0 Replies

Welcome to New Forest Farmhttps://newforestfarm.usNew Forest Farm is a diverse Restoration Agriculture research site in the Driftless Area of Southwestern Wisconsin.Founded and stewarded by the Shepard family…Continue

Dutch Elm Disease

Started by Bob Schumacher in Forest Health. Last reply by John McNerney Feb 3. 4 Replies

Our elm trees that have survived the last fifteen years of the disease being in our woods are looking very healthy.  I really enjoy the elms and we have a few very good size ones now.  I would lie some day to make some lumber with them.Continue

The Role of Insects and Diseases in Aspen Biology

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Forest Health Feb 2. 0 Replies

The Role of Insects and Diseases in Aspen BiologyJohn Guyon, Forest Pathologist, USFS, Intermountain RegionDate: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 ----  Time: 12 pm (MST)   ----  …Continue

Badge

Loading…

© 2018   Created by Peter Smallidge.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service