Here is an interesting story from central CT and the practice of sustainable forestry on private lands (link to story).  It is nice to see some stories from the eastern US where private owners are unabashedly deciding to manage their forest in a fashion that is productive, aesthetic, conservation-minded, and sustainable.  But, I would argue, all the forestry we practice on private (or public) lands should meet such criteria.  The owner found a competent forester and worked through the details.  Each parcel would of course have different details.

 

There is another and interesting spin on the story, and perhaps why it made the news.  The owner is participating in a regional/local effort called Walktober Fest.  In this community, a series of 100 walks, hikes, paddles, and other events will allow local and not-so-local folks to enjoy and learn about the natural world around them.  The woodlot owner has agreed to lead a walk in his woods to talk about the value and virtue of practicing sustainable forestry.

 

Below are some recent photos, courtesy of Rebecca Hargrave, of some landowners on their own version of a Walktober Fest focused on small woodlot management and ATV logging.  See more about ATV logging here.  See the calendar on this site for future similar events.

Views: 859

Comment by Rich Taber on October 26, 2011 at 5:13pm

A slight correction to this post: the property is in Griswold Ct. which is in the northern part of New London County, which is in Eastern Ct; I know this because this is where I grew up and first became enamored of the natural world. The Walktoberfest mentioned is sponsored by The Last Green Valley, an organization dedicated to the preservation of the natural heritage of Eastern Ct. and a small part of adjacent Massachusetts.  The Last Green Valley, if viewed from a nightime satellite photo, is the only area in the northeastern seaboard between Washington D.C. and Boston that is not drowned out by lights.  This organization is an excellent example of the "think globally, act locally" concept. It is a beautiful area and this organization and people are doing a great job of trying to preserve this part of New England.  Info can be found at http://www.tlgv.org.

  

Comment

You need to be a member of CornellForestConnect to add comments!

Join CornellForestConnect

Forum

controlling beech

Started by robert dalbo in Woodlot Management. Last reply by robert dalbo on Tuesday. 2 Replies

I have a section on my property approximately 5 acres with mature oak and maples 18 to 20 inches, well spaced, but the understory is a combination of beech and ferns. I have cut some beech and sprayed some the ferns with mediocre success. I do not…Continue

New film & resources to help YOU save forests!

Started by Lew Ward in Woodlot Management Nov 19. 0 Replies

'New film & resources to help YOU save forests!A new, short, animated (and…Continue

Tags: Management, Growth, Old

IPhone surveys

Started by Jim Martin in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Jim Martin Oct 27. 2 Replies

Smart phones have GPS.  Has anyone figured out how to use them for mapping wooded land.  I am especially interested in a way to map  my logging trails. Jim MartinContinue

Oldest Flowering Tree in North Americal

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Forest Health Oct 2. 0 Replies

Fossil of Oldest Flowering Tree in North America Discovered. And It Was Huge. -- https://www.livescience.com/63719-flowering-tree-fossil-cretaceous.htmlContinue

Slash and squirt control of Ailanthus

Started by Mark Horberg in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Peter Smallidge Sep 23. 5 Replies

I have 20-30 ailanthus trees on my property in the 4-6 inch diameter range.  What specific herbicide and concentration should I use for slash and squirt?  Can you recommend a place where it can be purchased in small quantities?  Thanks. Continue

inaturalist

Started by Alicia Rose in Agroforestry. Last reply by Linda Rohleder Sep 22. 1 Reply

Check out www.inaturalist.org Contribute to ScienceEvery observation can contribute to biodiversity science, from the rarest butterfly to the most common backyard weed. We share your findings with scientific…Continue

Badge

Loading…

© 2018   Created by Peter Smallidge.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service