All Blog Posts (249)

Conspiracy of Leaf Color-Change

Fall Color Conspiracy

Conspiracy hypotheses (or theories, as we like to call them, since “hypotheses” cannot be uttered without a lisp) seem to multiply unfettered these days, so I feel awkward birthing yet another. But you may be intrigued to learn that the wide spectrum of color in the region’s fall foliage is largely the result of a Depression-era project implemented by the Hoover Administration.

We live in one of the few places on Earth where trees produce such a…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on September 12, 2020 at 6:49am — No Comments

Learning to Speak Pine

Pine Whisperers

The term psithurism (sith-er-izm) doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, but it’s not meant to. The word, from the Greek psithuros (whisper), indicates the melody that rolls off pine needles in a gentle wind. It also means the sound of “proper” leaves shaking in the treetops. Obviously, we need another word, because these two things – whispering pines and rustling leaves – may both soothe us, but they sound quite different.

In our little home in the…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on August 29, 2020 at 9:56am — No Comments

Tree Defenses

Tree Protection

Paul Hetzler, ISA Certified Arborist

As someone whose job it is to help preserve trees, I find it ironic that in nearly every case I am saving them from us. We injure their root systems, whack them with mowers and weed-eaters, plant them too deeply, and do many other things which jeopardize their health. It would be terrifying if they could fight back in the manner of Tolkien’s magical Fangorn Forest. For one thing, tree work would be a lot more dangerous than…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on August 22, 2020 at 3:24pm — No Comments

The End of Sugar Maples?

Maples on the Move

Unless trees are wondrously furtive, I’m pretty sure they don’t travel. But their species ranges can. A report from the US Forest Service’s Northern Research Station indicates that due to climate change, 70% of Eastern tree species have already begun to shift their ranges to the north. The authors admit this is not a new trend, but rather the hastening of an old one:

“Tree ranges in ancient times certainly shifted according to changing climates, but the…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on August 19, 2020 at 8:50am — No Comments

The End of Sugar Maples?

Maples on the Move

Unless trees are wondrously furtive, I’m pretty sure they don’t travel. But their species ranges can. A report from the US Forest Service’s Northern Research Station indicates that due to climate change, 70% of Eastern tree species have already begun to shift their ranges to the north. The authors admit this is not a new trend, but rather the hastening of an old one:

“Tree ranges in ancient times certainly shifted according to changing climates, but the…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on August 19, 2020 at 8:50am — No Comments

Firewood For Charity (F4C) is Operating

The NYFOA WFL Chapter Firewood4Charity (F4C) initiative is operating at reduced capacity in order to comply with government directives.  Only four volunteers are permitted to work at a time vs. the six or more that would normally be on hand.  To compensate for the lower production workdays are scheduled every Wednesday and every second and fourth Saturday of the month.  Contact David Deuel at dsdeuel@gmail.com for more details and to volunteer.

Added by Dave Keebler on July 14, 2020 at 6:04pm — No Comments

Controlling Invasive Species in EAB infested woodland

(1) PROBLEMS WE WERE SOLVING WITH THIS PROJECT

In 2013 our family acquired a 23 acre property that was the first site where EAB was detected in Monroe County. From what we have learned, in an attempt to control the EAB the Ash were all cut, and apparently so were the…

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Added by Joanne Vaughn on July 13, 2020 at 3:00pm — No Comments

Forget Covid -- Lyme is Worse

Ticked Off Again

It seems the price we pay for warm weather is the onset of bug bites. Clouds of mosquitoes suck the fun out of outdoor activities, but one bite from a deer (black-legged) tick can put you out of commission for the whole season – maybe longer.

As recently as a decade ago in northern NY State it was unusual to find deer ticks on you even after a long day outdoors. Technically an invasive species, the deer tick (Ixodes scapularis) is another gift from…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on May 5, 2020 at 10:12am — 1 Comment

Managing Forest Landscapes Integrating climate mitigation with healthy air, clean water, and vibrant economies

A Cornell blog site that has information that may be helpful

http://blogs.cornell.edu/woodbury/forest/

Added by Lew Ward on April 15, 2020 at 2:13pm — No Comments

A Tool to Keep Forests Healthy and Productive

As we consider the future of our forests, we often hear natural resource folks refer to “resilience” as a desirable thing to achieve. What is resilience anyway? And why should we be concerned about it with respect to our woodlands? As woodland owners, can we be sure our interests are being met and push our forests towards resilience?

We have heard of ecosystem services in the context of the benefits that forests provide to society. Open space, wildlife habitat, biodiversity, clean…

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Added by Kristina Ferrare on April 13, 2020 at 2:00pm — No Comments

Management of Small Wooded Parcels

This blog is a link to the webinar on this topic on Wednesday March 18, 2020.  

Best Practices on a Small Wooded Acreage.

Many woodland owners have parcels that are “small” compared to other owners. These parcels are endearing to the owners, and provide many opportunities for activities to ensure they remain healthy and support the owner’s interests.…

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Added by Peter Smallidge on March 15, 2020 at 2:30pm — No Comments

Forest Bathing

Trees by the Tub-full

Paul Hetzler

A hot bath is an age-old remedy for calming our nerves, but science has now shown that a better tonic for anxiety and stress is bathing in the forest, fully dressed. True story. Of course, a few details would be helpful.

In a blinding flash of the obvious, research has proven that being around trees makes us feel better. To be fair, the scientific process requires measurable evidence, so in this case, real-time brain imaging with fMRI…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on February 23, 2020 at 9:43am — No Comments

Re-Thinking Black Locust

Not Plagued by Black Locusts

Paul Hetzler, ISA Certified Arborist

Sometimes I wonder if the Biblical plagues of ancient Egypt have lingered in one form or another. Blooms of toxic algae, which occasionally turn water a blood-red color, are on the increase. Gnats and lice have been supplanted by deer ticks, which I’d argue are even worse, and there is no shortage of hail in season. Frog outbreaks may not have occurred since Pharaoh’s time, but poisonous cane toads imported to…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on February 23, 2020 at 8:38am — 1 Comment

Avoiding Split Trees

Wishbone Trees

Breaking a wishbone, some believe, may impart good fortune to the person left with the bigger half. When a tree splits, though, everyone loses. Fortunately, by engaging a tree-care professional, we can control whether or not a Y-shaped tree splits.

Growing up, our family’s Thanksgiving traditions were well balanced. First we ate a lot, but after dinner my two brothers and I engaged in vigorous exercise for thirty minutes or so. That’s usually how long it took to…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on November 19, 2019 at 9:19pm — No Comments

Restoring forests may be one of our most powerful weapons in fighting climate change

  A particularly insightful article that introduces us to the complexity of the science of forestry, climate change, and carbon sequestration. Few articles integrate the the numerous studies that seemingly contradict each other, but I think we need more integrative science for an accurate assessment of the current situation. …

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Added by Lew Ward on October 13, 2019 at 9:52am — No Comments

Terminal Bud Scar: A Tree's Health Chart

Scarred for Life

Paul Hetzler, ISA Certified Arborist

It makes sense that dying trees have terminal bud scars. Sounds like an awful condition – my condolences. But the healthiest trees have them, too (terminal scars, not condolences). It’s a good thing, since terminal bud (aka bud-scale) scars provide an excellent way to leaf through a tree’s health records going back 5 to 10 years.

After a woody plant has its full complement of leaves, and they have hardened off, that…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on September 24, 2019 at 7:00pm — No Comments

Treeconomics 101: Early Fall Color Explained

Treeconomics 101: Color-Coded Prosperity



Deciduous trees, lakeside ice-cream stands, and marinas all close down each autumn for the same reason: as daylight dwindles and cold creeps in, their outfits become less and less profitable. At a certain point it makes sense to batten the hatches until the following spring.



Some enterprising holdouts stay open longer; perhaps they have a cost advantage others do not, or have less competition. A few are the opposite, closing shop…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on September 23, 2019 at 4:39pm — No Comments

Invasives decreasing carbon stored in US forests

"In addition to cleaning the air and water, forests hold a tremendous amount of sequestered carbon. When trees die and then decay on the forest floor, that carbon is released into the atmosphere, a phenomenon that is one of the drivers of climate change. A first-of-its-kind study by a team that included the United States Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service and Purdue University scientists finds that non-native invasive insects and diseases are reducing the amount of…

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Added by Lew Ward on September 20, 2019 at 1:35pm — No Comments

Scientists are finding that forests aren’t as good at fighting climate change as we thought.

Hardly as drastic as the headline would make you think. More like fine tuning and the results really only applicable for Northern hardwoods such as the beech, sugar maples and yellow birch.---LEW…


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Added by Lew Ward on September 19, 2019 at 8:15am — No Comments

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Forum

IPhone surveys

Started by Jim Martin in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Jim Martin 7 hours ago. 3 Replies

Smart phones have GPS.  Has anyone figured out how to use them for mapping wooded land.  I am especially interested in a way to map  my logging trails. Jim MartinContinue

How long do brush cutter blades work?

Started by Joanne Vaughn in Woodlot Management. Last reply by John McNerney on Sunday. 4 Replies

I dunno maybe it's because time flies when it's multiflora rose and buckthorns that are getting whacked. It seems that these blades are needing retirement after 8 or so hours.   Is this typical for this type of material. WIde range of material but…Continue

Tags: cutter, brush

Striped maple control

Started by WJ Rodenhouse in Woodlot Management Oct 2. 0 Replies

Looking for way to control large volume of striped maple and witch hazel. Both are interfering with growth of oak seedlings. Cut/treat stump? Hack and squirt? if so what chemical for either of these? Best time of year to treat?Best time of year to…Continue

Saving the American Chestnut

Started by Stephen Kutney in Woodlot Management Aug 24. 0 Replies

Below is a message from the American Chestnut Foundation on the deregulation of the Darling 58 blight-resistant American chestnut.SteveThe 60-day public comment period is now open and will remain open until Monday, October 19, 2020. Here are two…Continue

Forester recommendations?

Started by Roger Rodriguez in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Kelly Nywening Jul 15. 1 Reply

We are new to forestry ownership and need some advice. We would like to be good stewards of the property and also provide occasional profit of some kind, especially to offset the taxes we pay on the property. I was thinking tree farming (?) as a…Continue

Nitrogen fixing bacteria for Alder trees

Started by Joanne Vaughn in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Joanne Vaughn Jul 11. 14 Replies

I am thinking of starting some alder trees from seed for planting into an area that does not and has not hosted alders.  How can I gain the nitrogen fixing bacteria for inoculation of the roots ?  Continue

Seeking advice on controlling oriental bittersweet

Started by Kristen Whitbeck in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Lew Ward Apr 15. 2 Replies

A student in my silviculture class is seeking relayed the scenario below. If anyone has any tips or tricks I will gladly pass them along. Thanks in advance!"Oriental bittersweet is choking out my mature white pine trees and my mature apple trees.…Continue

Tags: bittersweet, Oriental

Are Gall's a reason to cull Hickory trees?

Started by Thomas Wilson in Forest Health. Last reply by Ron Goodger Apr 7. 8 Replies

I'll take a photo, but in the meantime....I have a lot of bitternut hickory and some shagbark as well.  I haven't yet noticed any on the shagbark, but about half of the bitternut have gall's.  They get up to about 3 inches in diameter.  Some tree's…Continue

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