After losing a planting of trees to voles/deer and now quite a number to the drought of '16 we are considering keeping our seedlings in a protected area with irrigation in grow bags so they can be easily relocated when they have attained a fighting size. 

We have been considering putting them in grow bags. Are there opinions out there about whether the root systems will be better off in fabric grow bags?

We were wondering if if is better to have a wider pot to encourage superficial root growth or a narrow pot to accommodate any tap roots?

Does this depend on species? 


Thanks for sharing.

Views: 115

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Joanne,

This preliminary information from a Colorado State study discusses fabric grow bags What Happens After You Transplant Trees

As for the shape of the bags it probably depends on your planting site soil.  If you have soil with a fragipan layer (hardpan) that restricts rooting depth, perhaps a shorter, wider bag pot would be better. During drought conditions larger transplants will still require frequent watering, so I always caution landowners to plant only what they can manage.  Hope this helps. 

Kevin

Thanks for the information. That study appears to indicate that trees developed in grow bags have a better chance of transplanting than pots or balled burlap.  There is some species differences. 

Yes we counted on the periodic rain that we THOUGHT was characteristic of our area. And the plantings to location made watering either an expensive irrigation project or a time consuming distribution project. 

I have read some other reports that give grow bags the edge: they seem to provide a less stressful root pruning, they provide better aeration and drainage and they provide a lighter tree to move to a new location.

The other thing they can provide is a choice of ball shape. Since we would be planting them into an area favoring a shallow root system (loam over high water table) it seems we should consider biasing toward a broad shallow root system. It appears that most tree species have adaptability in their root shape.

I just started using 1 gallon Rootmaker pots that I purchased through A.M. Leonard.  The Rootmaker video on these makes sense to me...no more circling roots (there are other air root pruning brands.)  The 1 gallon size is about 7-inches deep.  I don't know how the air root pruning will affect the eventual growth of a tap rooted species like the oaks and hickories, however, much of my land has a hard pan down not too deep so I don't believe a taproot would penetrate it very much.  I could be wrong.  Other than that I don't believe the shape of the pot has much bearing on how the trees perform afterwards.  I do believe that the air root pruned "stubs" will venture outside of the planting hole better than seedlings grown in a conventional pot with circling roots.

Also from what I've read, don't place any fertilizer in the planting hole or any sod you've removed from the planting hole.  Fertilizer in the planting hole encourages the roots to stay there, certainly a problem when drought strikes.  I always water each tree I plant during the first growing season; frequency depends on how much rainfall and the size of the tree planted...bigger trees need to be watered more often.  Weed control is essential; especially grass control.

I will be interested to hear how your Rootmakers work for you. I think the idea with them is to make a healthy root system by encouraging roots to grow out at all depths. I think the grow bags trap the rootlets and then when the plant is moved to a larger container all the rootlets are clipped and so that cutting causes the roots to generate a denser mat of  non circling roots. 

Stark Bros say they have EZ pots and trim the tap roots of nut trees to allow them to be transplanted easier.

http://www.starkbros.com/growing-guide/article/an-ez-start-to-growi...

I like the dimensions on the Stark Bros EZ pots, but wish they had incorporated air root pruning on the sides of the pots in addition to the bottom.  Their pots should take care of the taproot, but I think air root pruning on the sides would produce an even better root system?

RSS

Forum

Bark Beetle and Climate Change webinar - Aug 1st

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Forest Health Jul 26. 0 Replies

Bark Beetle Outbreaks in Western North America: Causes, Control and ConsequencesDr. Jodi Axelson, Assistant Cooperative Extension Specialist, UC BerkeleyDate: Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017Time: 12 pm (MDT) Learn at Lunch webinar - August 1, 2017 2PM EDT…Continue

plants for erosion control

Started by Jim Martin in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Kevin Mathers Jul 18. 1 Reply

I having a timber harvest.  A lot of new logging roads will be made on  100 acres. I need information about seeding to prevent erosion.  My guess is that some roads will be in heavy or light shade and some will be open.Any insight or information…Continue

Silvopasture Workshop

Started by Alicia Rose in Agroforestry Jul 6. 0 Replies

Silvopasture Workshop https://misanews.wordpress.com/2017/06/15/silvopasture-workshop/August 4-5, 2017La Crescent, MinnesotaThe University of Minnesota Extension,…Continue

TCIA - Voice of Tree Care

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Woodlot Management Jul 5. 0 Replies

PACT partners' support of TCIA helps the growth and development of the entire industry, making it possible for a more profitable and safe industry. Learn more about TCIA's PACT program and partners, visit…Continue

TCIA - Voice of Tree Care

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Woodlot Management Jul 5. 0 Replies

Partners Advancing Commercial Tree Care (PACT) is a strategic partnership between the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA) and industry companies who are invested in the future of the tree care industry. "We are looking for partners to work with us…Continue

Emerald Ash Borer App

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Forest Health Jul 5. 0 Replies

An App to Help Detect EABDeveloped by Colorado State University Extension & Colorado State Forest Service…Continue

GMO American Chestnuts - will the King of the Eastern Forests return?

Started by Brett Chedzoy in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Brett Chedzoy May 18. 6 Replies

copied over from the: www.silvopasture.ning.com forum...Since I first became obsessed with trees and forests and set out on a path to become a forester ~ 30 years ago, I have dreamed of someday seeing…Continue

Badge

Loading…

© 2017   Created by Peter Smallidge.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service