Paul J Hetzler's Blog (29)

Northern NYS EAB Info Meeting--Help Pass the Word

Run, Dorothy—Emerald City is Falling

Watertown is poised to become an Emerald City, but that’s not good news. Jefferson and Lewis will soon be Emerald Counties, and St. Lawrence County began the process of change two years ago. Unfortunately, this kind of transformation does not involve happy…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on November 5, 2018 at 9:59pm — No Comments

Foresters Need Laughter, Too

Evolution, Just for Fun

Every time I make primordial soup, it tastes terrible, but maybe some element is missing.

Roughly four billion years ago in the original batch of soup—or possibly it was a stew or even a souffle; that detail is a bit hazy—single-celled organisms first made an…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on October 13, 2018 at 5:28pm — 1 Comment

Tree Planting and Care Workshop

Plant a Tree or Rental It: Your Choice

Planting a tree isn’t rocket science, which is good thing. If it were that complex, I’d wager we’d have a lot fewer trees lining our streets. It may not take a scientist to plant a tree correctly, but a lot of money is spent each year to buy and plant trees which may as well be leased, because they will only live a fraction of their…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on September 30, 2018 at 5:30pm — No Comments

Porcelain Berry: Not Fragile Enough

Porcelain Berry

A total lunar eclipse is likely more common than the swift removal of a novel invasive plant infestation, but fingers are crossed that such a thing happened in St. Lawrence County this summer. The plant eradication, I mean—we all know about the celestial event this past July, the first central lunar eclipse since June 2011. Thanks to the sharp eyes of Dr. Tony Beane, a Professor of Veterinary Science at SUNY Canton who is also an avid naturalist, an exotic vine capable…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on September 30, 2018 at 3:17pm — No Comments

New Tick Species

Water-Skiing With Invasive Ticks



Years ago I read an author interview, and while I don’t recall her name, an image she raised has stayed with me—something to the effect that writing ought to feel as if you were water skiing behind your work. Usually, I find this to be the case. However, when I tried to water-ski behind a new invasive tick that reproduces without mating, drains the blood from livestock, and potentially carries an Ebola-like disease, something changed. A few topics… Continue

Added by Paul J Hetzler on September 10, 2018 at 7:13am — 1 Comment

Colors Tell You Which to Cull

The First Shall Not Last

Paul Hetzler

Seems like competitiveness may be part of human DNA. But it does not always pay to be first.



No prize awaits the fastest car that passes a radar patrol, or the first person to come down with the flu at the office. And for trees, the first ones to turn color in autumn are not envied by their peers. If trees experience envy, which no one knows. The first trees to show orange and red and drop their leaves are telling us to get quotes from… Continue

Added by Paul J Hetzler on September 4, 2018 at 10:51pm — 2 Comments

Ticked off about Lyme

Ticked Off

The downside of nice weather is that ticks like it too. Blackflies and mosquitoes can take the fun out of a day of hiking or gardening, but a single deer tick can ruin a whole summer if it transmits Lyme or other serious disease. Fortunately, there’s a relatively new tool in the battle against deer ticks: mice.

As recently as fifteen years ago in northern NY state it was rare to find a single black-legged tick, commonly known as a deer tick, on your person even after…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on April 28, 2018 at 9:05pm — No Comments

Arbor Day

What is an Arbor, Anyway?



Muskrat Day. Velcro Appreciation Month. Hair Follicle Hygiene Week. Arbor Day. You know it’s an obscure event when the greeting-card trade hasn’t bothered to capitalize on it. I like to think the industry knows Arbor Day is worthy of a Hallmark line, but that they’ve decided to honor its spirit by conserving paper. (C’mon, it’s possible.) While not the best-known observance, Arbor Day has a respectable history, as well as a local… Continue

Added by Paul J Hetzler on April 25, 2018 at 10:59pm — No Comments

Science Under Fire

Theory of Language

I’m amazed how communication, more complex than a spider web and far more fragile, actually seems to work from time to time. Even among those who share a common tongue, each has an internal dictionary, none of which entirely agrees with the next person’s. My wife is francophone, which adds a layer of complexity to the challenge of sharing ideas in a relationship.

But an even bigger issue can arise when folks fail to notice they’re speaking different…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on April 23, 2018 at 8:03pm — No Comments

Agroforestry: Log-grown Shiitake Mushrooms

Let Them Eat Wood

Nearly all historians agree Marie Antoinette probably never coined the phrase “Let them eat cake,” a saying already in popular culture before her time. The phrase was ascribed to her by opponents to bolster her reputation as callous and arrogant. She would have seemed far more benevolent if she had said “Let them eat wood.”

From remote villages to five-star urban restaurants, people around the world consume all manner of delectable dishes featuring second-hand…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on March 28, 2018 at 1:41pm — No Comments

Good Forestry Critical to Water Resources

(Note: This is by Joe Hovels, a longtime forester and proponent of good silviculture from Wisconsin. If you like this essay, consider signing up for his newsletter Wisconsin Partnerships in Forestry at logcabin@nnex.net)

Water:A Tragedy of Responsibility Joe Hovels, Wisconsin Partnerships in Forestry Environmental problems place great constraint on all societies. The response of the society, its leaders in particular, determines the…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on March 26, 2018 at 12:58pm — No Comments

Adopt a Trap Tree this Spring

Trap Trees

When I hear the phrase “trap tree,” an image of Charlie Brown’s kite-eating tree in the Peanuts comic strip comes immediately to mind. But trap trees, or sentinel trees, are meant to nab a much smaller airborne object, the emerald ash borer (EAB).

The idea is to make certain ash trees more attractive to EAB, to serve both as a monitoring tool and as a means of slowing the rate of ash death. Early in the growing season, a chosen ash tree is…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on March 24, 2018 at 11:32am — 1 Comment

Life's a Beech Sometimes

(Note: This is intended as a resource to pass along to general audiences as an introduction to the issue. Peter has loads of detailed information on beech thickets on his blog and elsewhere, so the only thing Forestconnect members will gain form reading this is possibly a smile.)

Beech Gone Wild

The sturdy, long-lived and stately American beech, Fagus grandifolia, has been slowly dying out since 1920, when a tiny European insect pest was accidentally released…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on March 7, 2018 at 3:30pm — No Comments

Invasive Forest Pests: ISAW is February 26-March 3

Invasive Species Awareness Week



In Grade 3, a brilliant joke made the rounds. We’d hold up a sheet of blank white paper and announce it was a polar bear in a snowstorm. Genius is relative for kids. But the first time I drove into a whiteout made me realize how accurate that “art” project was. Anything can hide behind a veneer of snow.



This leads me to ask why February 26-March 3 was chosen as “National Invasive Species Awareness Week.” By this time of year, our awareness… Continue

Added by Paul J Hetzler on February 12, 2018 at 3:51pm — No Comments

Forest-tent Caterpillars

Not in Tents, Just Intense



Winter is not a season when people think about tents, except maybe to be glad they do not live in one. I do have friends who love winter camping, and the fact they have never extended an invitation is evidence of how much they value our friendship.



Oddly enough, winter is a crucial time to look for signs of forest-tent caterpillars (FTC). In spite of their name, FTC do not weave a silken tent-like nest as do the eastern-tent caterpillar and other… Continue

Added by Paul J Hetzler on January 26, 2018 at 2:19am — 4 Comments

Preventing Tree Breakage

Cradles and Cables

We are a clever lot when it comes to helping our kids settle into bed at night. Apparently, the story of how Jack broke his head fetching a pail of water, with Jill falling down the well after him, or the charming bubonic plague ditty “Ring Around the Rosie,” is supposed to calm small children. The veiled threat about abandoning an infant in a tree on a windy night always made my kids hush up. “Rock-a-bye baby, in the treetop; when the wind blows, the cradle will…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on January 14, 2018 at 8:18pm — No Comments

Timber Theft

Timber Theft

Only the crunch of gravel mars the predawn quiet as a truck, headlights off, rolls to a stop. Working quickly, professional bandits round up your unsuspecting timber. As your herd of prized trees is prodded toward the tailgate ramp, their soft mewling is barely audible amidst all the rustling…

While it does at times parallel cattle rustling, with skilled thieves whisking away a few exceptionally valuable trees in an early-morning or weekend raid, timber theft…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on January 8, 2018 at 1:38pm — No Comments

Preventing Salt Injury to Trees and Shrubs

Every winter brings its annual a-salt on roads and walkways. In icy conditions, salt can be a good thing, but too much of it is worse than a bad pun. Cars, equipment, and concrete suffer in obvious ways, but damage to trees and other woody plants is much less invisible. Salt injures trees and shrubs by several means.



When road-salt spray hits twigs, buds and, in the case of evergreens, foliage, such direct contact causes yellowing of needles, and subsequent death of evergreen twigs… Continue

Added by Paul J Hetzler on January 5, 2018 at 2:35pm — No Comments

When Trees Go Over the Hill

Senescence is the decline in vigor that happens to all creatures great and diminutive as they close in on the life expectancy of their species. People my age suddenly find it hard to read the phone book. Though I suppose by definition anyone still using a phone book is old enough to need glasses, right?



The onset of this process varies—you probably know of families whose members frequently retain good health into their 90s and beyond, and other families where that is not the case. Of… Continue

Added by Paul J Hetzler on January 3, 2018 at 7:59pm — No Comments

Don't Let Firewood Bug You

All of us are using more heating fuel this season than in recent winters, and there is still plenty of cold weather to come. It’s bad enough that our wallets are thinner, but those who heat with wood have the additional burden of more time spent lugging in fuel. And to add insult to injury, uninvited guests occasionally show up with the wood.

Firewood, I’ve been told, comes from “trees” which seem to be covered in “bark,” under which insects can hide. As the wood we bring inside warms…

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Added by Paul J Hetzler on January 2, 2018 at 3:50pm — No Comments

Forum

controlling beech

Started by robert dalbo in Woodlot Management. Last reply by robert dalbo on Tuesday. 2 Replies

I have a section on my property approximately 5 acres with mature oak and maples 18 to 20 inches, well spaced, but the understory is a combination of beech and ferns. I have cut some beech and sprayed some the ferns with mediocre success. I do not…Continue

New film & resources to help YOU save forests!

Started by Lew Ward in Woodlot Management Nov 19. 0 Replies

'New film & resources to help YOU save forests!A new, short, animated (and…Continue

Tags: Management, Growth, Old

IPhone surveys

Started by Jim Martin in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Jim Martin Oct 27. 2 Replies

Smart phones have GPS.  Has anyone figured out how to use them for mapping wooded land.  I am especially interested in a way to map  my logging trails. Jim MartinContinue

Oldest Flowering Tree in North Americal

Started by Carl DuPoldt in Forest Health Oct 2. 0 Replies

Fossil of Oldest Flowering Tree in North America Discovered. And It Was Huge. -- https://www.livescience.com/63719-flowering-tree-fossil-cretaceous.htmlContinue

Slash and squirt control of Ailanthus

Started by Mark Horberg in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Peter Smallidge Sep 23. 5 Replies

I have 20-30 ailanthus trees on my property in the 4-6 inch diameter range.  What specific herbicide and concentration should I use for slash and squirt?  Can you recommend a place where it can be purchased in small quantities?  Thanks. Continue

inaturalist

Started by Alicia Rose in Agroforestry. Last reply by Linda Rohleder Sep 22. 1 Reply

Check out www.inaturalist.org Contribute to ScienceEvery observation can contribute to biodiversity science, from the rarest butterfly to the most common backyard weed. We share your findings with scientific…Continue

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