[I'm pasting from a recent email thread]

Question - 

I'm working on a couple beech regen and mid story control projects.   I have been using Garlon 4 in oil.   Works good, but sometimes I want it to move through the roots and the Garlon doesn't do that.   Looking on line this morning I saw your name come up on a couple things.   

 Have you had good luck with glyphosate as cut stump?  Stump diameters from 1/2" to 8".  I haven't used glyphosate for that.    I'll use rodeo because thats why I have for foliar work.   Looking at active ingredient requirements, I'm guessing that glyphosate for cut stump needs to be at 50% mixture.   

My response - 

Rodeo has glyphosate as its active ingredient.  As you note, glyphosate is mobile in the plant and garlon (triclopyr) is not. Cut stump or cut surface treatments with glyphosate will flash into the root system to kill beech suckers, and there is no known evidence that it will move into any other species.  Use a minimum of 25% active ingredient, but 40 to 50% active ingredient is slightly better.  A couple links for beech

https://blogs.cornell.edu/cceforestconnect/files/2015/12/seasonal-b...

https://blogs.cornell.edu/ccednrpublications/files/2015/03/american...

 

I use both Rodeo and Accord XRT II. Both have glyphosate at about 50% active ingredient so you can cut with water up to 1:1 to achieve a 25% active ingredient.  I often use 3 or 4 parts of product to 1 part water…just enough water to ease the flow through the sprayer.  Here’s a refresher on how to mix to achieve a desired concentration.  https://blogs.cornell.edu/cceforestconnect/files/2015/12/Mixing-her...

 

Rodeo does not have a surfactant, but Accord XRT II does. I’m not aware of any advantage or not to the surfactant for cut-stump treatments.  The bigger the stump the more chemical that is available to move into the root network. Also, bigger stumps by default have a greater reduction in the basal area of standing trees that otherwise horde the glyphosate (e.g., bigger trees make bigger stumps which is good because the stump has more surface and the tree is removed from the connection).  The small stumps are likely connected to a larger stump (or not) and thus would not need to be treated. They have such little surface area that they don’t move much glyphosate into the root network. No harm in treating the small stumps, but likely not much benefit.

 

I’ve had good luck with flash in beech during October, likely the same through middle November. Not sure about December. There is almost no flash when the wood is frozen.

Views: 364

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Thanks for referencing the two articles. Two questions after reading them.

1. Could you please give the details of the updated "drill and fill" option to "hack and squirt" that you discussed in the MFO training in the field? (or reference any already written update).  

2. The link given in the biblio of "American Beech Fact Sheet" for looking up a NYS registered pesticide (http://magritte.psur.cornell.edu/pims/current/) appears to no longer be functional. Could you reference the correct path?

thanks!

Hi Freyda:

Thanks for the note and identification of the broken URL.

Regarding "drill and fill" - This technique uses a 3/8" diameter drill bit with a brad point (or spade bit) to create a hole that is about 1 inch deep at a 45 degree angle in the tree being treated. A hole of this diameter, depth and angle results in a volume of about 1 ml, which is the dose per each three inches of tree diameter for the application of the concentrated treatment with products such as Arsenal or Accord XRT II (not an endorsement; also see the label for details of "concentrate").

Here is the link for NYS registered pesticides.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/nyspad/products?0

Wondering if garlon (triclopyr)  could also be used to control sprouting black locust without killing the original tree. 

RSS

Forum

Spotted lantern fly in maple stands - effects?

Started by Tim Levatich in Forest Health Sep 9. 0 Replies

Hi, All.I've been reading brief mentions that spotted lantern fly "likes maple". I'm wondering if there is any experience so far with what happens to a forest that has a heavy proportion of maple composition and is hit with a SLF infestation. Our…Continue

Tags: grapes, orchard, fruit, slf, lantern

Hypo-hatchet

Started by Mike Blasko in Woodlot Management Jul 28. 0 Replies

I just got a hypo-hatchet to use for beech hack and squirt treatments. The manufacturer states to only use with Amine herbicides only. Is glyphosate an Amine or Ester herbicide?Continue

IPhone surveys

Started by Jim Martin in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Peter Smallidge Jul 13. 13 Replies

Smart phones have GPS.  Has anyone figured out how to use them for mapping wooded land.  I am especially interested in a way to map  my logging trails. Jim MartinContinue

Forester recommendations?

Started by Roger Rodriguez in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Michael Dirac Jul 10. 2 Replies

We are new to forestry ownership and need some advice. We would like to be good stewards of the property and also provide occasional profit of some kind, especially to offset the taxes we pay on the property. I was thinking tree farming (?) as a…Continue

succession after a pine plantation

Started by Jim Martin in Woodlot Management Jun 23. 0 Replies

About 1982 I planted 8000 white pine in a former pasture on the advice of my ex-forester with an OK from the DEC. They got badly weeviled.  I thinned   every third row  and  later also   hit  the most damaged ones which were left.  I hoped to favor…Continue

Hemlock

Started by Chaz U. Farly in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Jim Martin Jun 23. 2 Replies

Is there a reason the State of New York stopped selling hemlock seedlings? I'd made up my mind that I'd like to plant a hundred, maybe more, for my grandsons to enjoy, but find no source. Continue

How long do brush cutter blades work?

Started by Joanne Vaughn in Woodlot Management. Last reply by Joanne Vaughn May 19. 8 Replies

I dunno maybe it's because time flies when it's multiflora rose and buckthorns that are getting whacked. It seems that these blades are needing retirement after 8 or so hours.   Is this typical for this type of material. WIde range of material but…Continue

Tags: cutter, brush

Badge

Loading…

© 2021   Created by Peter Smallidge.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service